Flags of Convenience

Flag of convenience registries and statistics (of ships of 1,000 GRT and greater)
Registry Ships Registered Foreign-owned ships Percent Foreign Foreign-owned ship profile Remarks
Antigua and Barbuda Antigua and Barbuda International Shipping Register[3] 1,257[4] 1,215[4] 97% Germany 1094, Denmark 20, Netherlands 17, Latvia 16, Estonia 10, Iceland 10, Norway 9, Switzerland 7, Turkey 7, US 7, Greece 4, Lithuania 3, Russia 3, New Zealand 2, Poland 2, Albania 1, Colombia 1, Mexico 1, UK 1[4]
The Bahamas Bahamas Maritime Authority 1,160[5] 1,063[5] 92% Greece 225, Norway 186, US 109, Canada 96, Japan 88, Denmark 69, Poland 34, Germany 30, Cyprus 23, Netherlands 23, UAE 23, UK 18, Saudi Arabia 16, Bermuda 15, France 15, Malaysia 13, Sweden 11, Finland 8, Monaco 8, Singapore 7, Angola 6, Belgium 6, Guernsey 6, Spain 6, Thailand 4, Hong Kong 3, Ireland 3, Turkey 3, Indonesia 2, Jordan 2, Montenegro 2, Nigeria 2, Australia 1, Brazil 1, Croatia 1, Italy 1, Kuwait 1, South Korea 1, Switzerland 1[5][6]
Barbados Barbados Maritime Ship Registry 109[7] 83[7] 76% Norway 38, Greece 14, Canada 11, UK 6, Iran 5, Sweden 4, Lebanon 2, Syria 1, Turkey 1, UAE 1[7]
Belize International Merchant Marine Registry of Belize 247[8] 152[8] 62% China 61, Russia 30, Turkey 16, Latvia 9, Ukraine 6, Singapore 4, Syria 4, UK 4, Italy 3, UAE 3, Greece 2, Norway 2, Bulgaria 1, Croatia 1, Estonia 1, Iceland 1, Lithuania 1, Netherlands 1, Switzerland 1, Thailand 1[8] China refuses diplomatic relations with Belize
Bermuda Bermuda Department of Maritime Administration[9] 139[10] 105[10] 76% US 26, Germany 14, Sweden 14, UK 14, Nigeria 11, Greece 8, Norway 5, Hong Kong 4, Israel 3, Japan 2, Monaco 2, France 1, Ireland 1[10]
Bolivia Bolivia 18[11] 5[11] 28% Syria 4, UK 1[11] Bolivia is a landlocked nation
Cambodia International Ship Registry of Cambodia 544[12] 352[12] 65% China 177, Russia 50, Ukraine 35, Syria 22, Turkey 15, Hong Kong 10, South Korea 10, Lebanon 5, Cyprus 4, Egypt 4, Singapore 3, Canada 2, Greece 2, Indonesia 2, UAE 2, Belgium 1, Estonia 1, French Polynesia 1, Gabon 1, Ireland 1, Japan 1, Taiwan 1, UK 1, Vietnam 1[12]
Cayman Islands Cayman Islands Shipping Registry[13] 116[14] 102[14] 88% US 57, Japan 23, Greece 9, Italy 7, Germany 3, UK 2, Switzerland 1[14]
Comoros Maritime Administration of the Union of Comoros 149[15] 73[15] 49% Russia 12, Ukraine 10, Turkey 8, UAE 8, Pakistan 5, Syria 5, Bulgaria 4, Greece 4, Cyprus 2, Kenya 2, Latvia 2, Lebanon 2, US 2, Bangladesh 1, China 1, Kuwait 1, Lithuania 1, Nigeria 1, Norway 1, UK 1[15]
Curaçao Curaçao Directorate of Shipping and Maritime Affairs 120[16] 101[16] 84% Netherlands 52, Germany 32, Turkey 8, Angola 2, Norway 2, Cuba 1, Denmark 1, Estonia 1, Hong Kong 1, Sweden 1[16] Figures are from most recent World Factbook data listed for Netherlands Antilles.
Cyprus Republic of Cyprus Department of Merchant Shipping 838[17] 622[17] 74% Greece 201, Germany 192, Russia 46, Poland 24, Netherlands 23, France 16, Japan 16, Norway 14, Iran 10, UK 7, China 6, Denmark 6, Estonia 6, Italy 6, Spain 6, Slovenia 5, Sweden 5, US 5, India 4, Belgium 3, Ireland 3, UAE 3, Ukraine 3, Canada 2, Hong Kong 2, Portugal 2, Angola 1, Austria 1, Bermuda 1, Philippines 1, Singapore 1, Turkey 1[17]
Equatorial Guinea Equatorial Guinea 5[18] 1[18] 20% Norway 1[18]
Faroe Islands Faroe Islands 37[19] 28[19] 76% Norway 13, Sweden 11, Iceland 4[19]
France French International Ship Register[20] 162[21] 151[21] 93% UK 39, Cyprus 16, Bahamas 15, Luxembourg 15, Malta 8, Belgium 7, Marshall Islands 7, Panama 7, Norway 5, Hong Kong 4, US 4, Morocco 3, Singapore 3, Ireland 2, Italy 2, Netherlands 2, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2, South Korea 2, Taiwan 2, Bermuda 1, Canada 1, Egypt 1, Indonesia 1, Mexico 1, unknown 1[21]
Georgia (country) Georgia 142[22] 95[22] 67% Syria 24, Turkey 14, China 10, Ukraine 10, Egypt 7, Romania 7, Russia 6, UK 5, Hong Kong 3, Italy 2, UAE 2, Bulgaria 1, Israel 1, Latvia 1, Lebanon 1, US 1[22]
Germany German International Ship Register 427[23] 6[23] 1% Finland 3, Switzerland 2, Netherlands 1[23]
Gibraltar Gibraltar Ship Registry 267[24] 254[24] 95% Germany 123, Norway 46, Netherlands 34, Sweden 11, Greece 8, Denmark 7, UK 6, UAE 5, Italy 4, Morocco 4, Finland 2, Belgium 1, Cyprus 1, Iceland 1, Jersey 1[24]
Honduras Honduras 88[25] 47[25] 53% Singapore 11, South Korea 6, Bahrain 5, Greece 4, Japan 4, China 2, Egypt 2, Lebanon 2, Thailand 2, Canada 1, Chile 1, Israel 1, Montenegro 1, Panama 1, Taiwan 1, UAE 1, UK 1, US 1[25] China refuses diplomatic relations with Honduras
Jamaica Jamaica Ship Registry[26] 14[27] 14[27] 100% Germany 10, Greece 3, Denmark 1[27]
Lebanon Lebanese Bureau of Shipping 29[28] 2[28] 7% Syria 2[28]
Liberia Liberian International Ship & Corporate Registry 2,771[29] 2,581[29] 93% Germany 1185, Greece 505, Russia 109, Japan 110, Taiwan 94, US 53, Hong Kong 48, Italy 47, Norway 38, UAE 37, Israel 34, UK 32, Netherlands 31, Switzerland 25, Singapore 22, UK 22, Brazil 20, Saudi Arabia 20, Turkey 16, Poland 13, Sweden 12, Ukraine 10, Chile 9, Cyprus 9, Denmark 8, India 8, Monaco 8, Slovenia 7, Gibraltar 5, Latvia 5, Qatar 5, Bermuda 4, China 4, Indonesia 4, Nigeria 4, Egypt 3, Romania 3, Canada 2, South Korea 2, Angola 1, Argentina 1, Australia 1, Belgium 1, Croatia 1, Lebanon 1, Syria 1, Uruguay 1[29]
Malta Transport Malta 1,650[30] 1,437[30] 87% Greece 469, Turkey 233, Germany 135, Norway 96, Iran 48, Italy 45, Russia 45, Denmark 34, US 34, Cyprus 32, Ukraine 29, Poland 21, UK 21, Switzerland 20, Estonia 16, Bermuda 15, Bulgaria 8, France 8, Latvia 8, Spain 8, Angola 7, Belgium 7, Romania 7, China 6, Croatia 6, Lebanon 6, Canada 5, Japan 5, Libya 5, Oman 5, Hong Kong 4, Ireland 4, Singapore 4, Slovenia 4, Syria 4, Finland 3, India 3, Israel 3, Kuwait 3, Luxembourg 3, Monaco 3, Netherlands 3, Portugal 3, Saudi Arabia 2, South Korea 2, Azerbaijan 1, Egypt 1, Malaysia 1, Sweden 1, UAE 1[30]
Marshall Islands International Registries, Inc. (Marshall Islands) 1,593[31] 1,468[31] 92% Greece 408, Germany 248, US 200, Norway 75, Turkey 70, Japan 59, South Korea 41, Cyprus 40, Bermuda 35, Monaco 30, Singapore 30, Qatar 29, Netherlands 21, Latvia 19, China 14, Croatia 12, Switzerland 12, UAE 12, UK 12, Jersey 11, Malaysia 11, India 10, Canada 8, Taiwan 8, Denmark 7, France 7, Ireland 6, Slovenia 6, Russia 5, Hong Kong 3, UK 3, Iraq 2, Kuwait 2, Mexico 2, Romania 2, Belgium 1, Brazil 1, Egypt 1, Indonesia 1, Italy 1, Pakistan 1, Sweden 1, Ukraine 1[31] China refuses diplomatic relations with Marshall Islands
Mauritius Ministry of Public Infrastructure, National Development Unit, Land Transport, & Shipping (Mauritius) 4[32] 0[32] 0%
Moldova Moldova Ship Registration 121[33] 63[33] 52% Turkey 18, Ukraine 14, Egypt 5, Russia 5, Syria 5, Yemen 4, UK 3, Israel 2, Romania 2, Bulgaria 1, Denmark 1, Greece 1, Lebanon 1, Pakistan 1[33] Moldova is a landlocked nation.
Mongolia Mongolia Ship Registry 57[34] 44[34] 77% Vietnam 33, Singapore 3, Indonesia 2, Japan 2, Russia 2, North Korea 1, Ukraine 1[34] Mongolia is a landlocked nation
Myanmar Department of Marine Administration (Myanmar) 29[35] 2[35] 7% Germany 1, Japan 1[35]
North Korea North Korea 158[36] 13[36] 8% Syria 4, China 3, UAE 2, Belgium 1, Nigeria 1, Singapore 1, South Korea 1[36]
Panama Autoridad Marítima de Panamá 6,413[37] 5,162[37] 80% Japan 2372, China 534, Greece 379, South Korea 373, Taiwan 328, Hong Kong 144, Singapore 92, US 90, UAE 83, Norway 81, Turkey 62, Russia 49, Vietnam 43, Denmark 41, UK 37, Syria 34, Spain 30, Bermuda 27, Italy 25, Germany 24, India 24, Switzerland 15, Chile 14, Venezuela 13, Kuwait 12, Malaysia 12, Egypt 11, Jordan 11, Monaco 11, Saudi Arabia 11, Indonesia 10, Oman 10, Portugal 10, Peru 9, Ukraine 8, France 7, Bahamas 6, Bulgaria 6, Canada 6, Netherlands 6, Nigeria 6, Thailand 6, Mexico 5, UK 5, Argentina 5, Bangladesh 5, Cyprus 5, Iran 5, Philippines 5, Australia 4, Albania 4, Yemen 4, Brazil 3, Burma 3, Ecuador 3, Lithuania 3, Pakistan 3, Romania 3, Colombia 2, Croatia 2, Cuba 2, Finland 2, Lebanon 2, Maldives 2, Malta 2, Sweden 2, Tanzania 2, Belgium 1, Gabon 1, Gibraltar 1, Ireland 1, Israel 1, Luxembourg 1, Qatar 1[37] China refuses diplomatic relations with Panama
São Tomé and Príncipe São Tomé and Príncipe 3[38] 2[38] 67% China 1, Greece 1[38] China refuses diplomatic relations with São Tomé and Príncipe
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines SVG Maritime Administration (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines)[39] 412[40] 325[40] 79% China 65, Greece 42, US 18, Latvia 15, Norway 13, Turkey 13, Ukraine 12, Russia 11, Sweden 10, Bulgaria 9, Denmark 9, Lithuania 9, Syria 9, Croatia 8, Estonia 8, Switzerland 7, Belgium 7, UK 6, Hong Kong 5, Singapore 5, Italy 4, Cyprus 3, Germany 3, Israel 3, Japan 3, Poland 3, UAE 3, Egypt 2, France 2, Guyana 2, Kenya 2, Lebanon 2, Monaco 2, Austria 1, Azerbaijan 1, Bangladesh 1, Bermuda 1, Czech Republic 1, Dominica 1, Netherlands 1, Romania 1, Slovenia 1, Venezuela 1[40] China refuses diplomatic relations with Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Sri Lanka Merchant Shipping Division (Sri Lanka) 21[41] 8[41] 38% Germany 8[41]
Tonga Tonga 7[42] 2[42] 29% Australia 1, UK 1[42] International registry suspended in 2002.[43]
Vanuatu Vanuatu Maritime Services Limited 77[44] 72[44] 94% Japan 39, Poland 9, Russia 7, Canada 5, Greece 3, Singapore 2, US 2, Belgium 1, China 1, Norway 1, Taiwan 1, UAE 1[44]

cc: creative commons

Working Toward WetLand

The one-page document I’ve been working on to explain WetLand:

 header
Overview of the WetLand project

WetLand is an island-based ecosystem and mobile habitat that will float on the Delaware River.  To be offered in the summer of 2014, WetLand is a stage for storytelling about our community’s shared future, and about the impact each individual can have on the environment. Combining art, life on the water, architecture, and environmental technologies into one space, it promotes involvement through an environment based on exchange. A central part of the project will be take-away materials with instructions for building some of the systems on board WetLand.

WetLand resembles a partially submerged building, describing our potential environmental future. A 40x20x3’ seafaring vessel composes the primary infrastructure. The interior of the partially submerged house contains a live, work, and enclosed performance space. WetLand’s ecosystem include rainwater collection and purification, greywater filtration, dry compost systems, chickens, outdoor vegetable gardens, indoor aquaponics, and railing gardens circling WetLand’s perimeter. Building supplies for WetLand include reused materials from the local waste-stream such as steel, 55-gallon drums, wood, and architectural tensile fabric. Terraformed gardens around the perimeter of the structure will mimic a natural wetland. As experiments, we will monitor them to test their remediation qualities throughout the project. Through partnerships with local educational institutions such as Lincoln High School, WetLand will engage students to help steward the space, collect data about energy use and production, and test and maintain on-board water systems.

Events will be programmed with FringeArts. Residents will live on board and host activities, from workshops to skill shares. High school and college students in Philadelphia will help steward the space, collect data about energy use and production, and test and maintain onboard water systems. Equal parts symbolic, social, stage, shelter, and service, WetLand is an argument for thriving local economies that consider our environment.

Where: WetLand will be constructed at Pier 9, across from FringeArts in Old Town, Philadelphia. It will be tugged to Penn’s Landing adjacent to the Seaport Museum and open to the public on August 15,2014.

When: WetLand will launch August 15th on the Delaware River at Penn’s Landing and run through  September 31, 2014.

Why:   Art is integral to imagining new worlds.  WetLand is a mobile, sculptural habitat and public space atop a barge made to explore solutions for sea-level rise, housing, resource interdependence, and a decrease in useable land. Increased attention paid to the social and environmental impacts involved in resource production, distribution, use, and finally discard are important ideas to take away from WetLand. The structure integrates nature with urban spaces. WetLand helps local economies strengthen and grow by bringing together a broad range of communities to the space. This enables new friendships and collective experiences through exchange-based collaborations, while recognizing other ways of working and being together and living with nature.

How:  Building supplies for WetLand are reclaimed from the local waste stream to further narrate a future when reuse is common and parts are made with found materials. This project will be completed through FringeArts, the James L. Knight Foundation, the Independent Seaport Museum and the partnerships we make together.

Flock Houses and Wearable Homes

The limited space inside of Flock Houses and Wearable Homes confined their users to only the most necessary objects, while every object that was brought onto the Waterpod stayed there and became either compost or a repurposed building element.  Recently, I have been exploring human and environmental ramifications in the production and distribution pathways of the objects that I carry. Beginning by researching each object I surround myself with in terms of its production, I ask: Who and what was affected during production and distribution, and how am I implicated in the potential damages? How do the objects I own mediate my life and how can they control my daily routine? Critic and historian Jennifer González has written about autotopographies in part to explain the relationship between things and a person’s subjectivity. I anticipate reaching a multifaceted understanding about the social agency an object carries and thereby confronting the idea and reality of exponential growth.

On Site and Triple Island

Video: Andrea De Pascual Otero de Saavedra and Daniel Duran Tortonda

Video: Art21

Notes on Site Specificity and the Triple Island series:

Triple Island was the second in a series of works about living in public space, theater (real time and live) about economic, political, and climactic migration. Like a musical composition there are three movements. From the Flock House Project, we migrated one of the Flock Houses to Triple Island. Triple Island will then move to WetLand with a boat made from the remnants and carrying the useable supplies.

What does a nomadic site mean? The land a nomadic site in itself, the pier’s use changed from a working pier where trade and exchange took place, to a dumping ground, to a city owned park and experiment in co-ownership. In this case, it brings up the watery supply chain that references “flags of convenience” and the mobility of goods vs. people (back to Deleuze and Guattari’s Nomadology, and access to mobility versus forced mobility).

Site:

Site is composed of not only a distinct geographic location but also a networkof social relations, of political and ethical dimensions. It represents an accumulated and continually interpreted past, present, and future. Spatially, shifting entities interact with a site both through integrating and standing apart. Site is active with energy, agency, and political undertone.

Site as geography: As a location, site comprises a combination of physical, experiential, and social elements. Geographically, it’s a myth to draw distinction between a natural and human-made site, as visible and invisible networks that influence a place need to be accounted for to comprehensively understand a location. From landowners to corporate resource extraction and zoning decisions, a site is determined through multiple stakeholders and histories. Complex institutional, political, and social frameworks constitute it.

Site as virtual: Site is configured through patterns of information, data collection, human and nonhuman contributors, and server space. A virtual site requires physical hardware to access it. This hardware is mined, produced, and stored in various locations that become its equivalent physical network to a virtual location.

Site as proposal: A site is mythologized, theoretical, and circumscribed. With embedded histories, it can propose a number of things. For instance, it can re-propose a commons, and then a more horizontal power structure through cooperation, communing, care, and mutual consideration. Simultaneously, it can propose a space where displacement and alienation create potential for being in between. Alterity and multiplicity can continually propose revised frameworks. Site as a place is both learned through resistance and acted upon.

Center versus periphery: If the colonizing engine that seeks to subjugate, conquer, and collect everything of speculated value has caused center and periphery to coalesce into the condition of site as described here, it is near impossible to draw distinction between “center” or “periphery” (or Nonsite/Site) in physical space. Perhaps today periphery is only information-based. This periphery consists of repressed or hidden facts about what happens in or on a site, insulated from peoples’ fields of knowledge and aided by fragmentation.

Artwork as actor: An artwork contains both its site of annunciation and its site of dissemination. Art commonly carries the burden of a museum or exhibition space (an expected site for artwork), and can impose an austere zone on a site that in some cases can reframe it. While an artist or group of artists may or may not have firsthand knowledge of a site they interact with or act upon, what might the benefits be of importing new perspective to a site, and how may brief encounters become residual?

-MM

http://therhizomaticmuseum.com/?p=253

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